Ryan Aussie Smith on Rabbit Air

We try to drink bottled water and eat organic but there isn’t much to do about our air quality… besides not smoking. This is what I used to think before my husband started working for Rabbit Air, creator of some of the best air purifiers on the market. Honestly, clean air is not something I’ve ever thought much about… until I learned these purifiers are also effective against viruses. Why do I suddenly care about viruses in 2020?

I wonder…

How Ryan handled dog smells before the MinusA2.

He was telling me all about some of the Rabbit Air models the other day and he suggested I do a blog post about how effective and important they are. That’s a good idea, I thought. And then I had a better idea. “You’re a writer. You’ve written a book! You should write the blog post.” He agreed.

I’m happy to introduce Ryan Aussie Smith, my husband and fellow writer, to share his knowledge. A little about him for those that don’t know… a native Australian, he co-publishes Space and Time with me and produces all the audio publications for the magazine. He is currently producing all my audio books as well. 

He just published his first book, Shadow’s Lament, which you can find on Amazon here. He is a second degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and he is my best friend. He complains about having too many dogs in the house, but since our house doesn’t smell like it has too many dogs (thanks to the MinusA2 air purifier) he complains much less. Marriage is all about compromises, after all.

And now, here’s everything you should know about air purifiers from Ryan Aussie Smith… Want to know about Rabbit Air purifiers? You can find them online here.


As I read this introduction, I want to mention that we still have too many dogs but Angela is correct that you can’t tell unless you actually see and hear them. This is largely because of the MinusA2 SPA-780N we have centrally located downstairs and a BioGS 2.0 SPA-625A located upstairs. The units have many filters but much of the heavy lifting is performed by the HEPA filter and charcoal based activated carbon filter. The HEPA filter is a TRUE HEPA filter, able to filter out 99.97% of particles down to 0.3 microns in size. The activated carbon filter can reduce all kinds of obnoxious odors from pets and cigarettes and less obnoxious odors from, say, cigars and bourbon.

Ryan Aussie Smith, unmasked

Now note where I say “centrally located.” This is a crucial part of helping an air purifier do its best for you. An air purifier needs a great location to actively draw in air to purify it. A common mistake is locating a purifier in locations with poor air circulation. If your air purifier can’t pull in ample air, it won’t be able to give you back ample purified air.

Up until the pandemic, the biggest reason people wanted air purifiers was for odor and allergen removal but 2020 has made us all suddenly aware of viruses. Some of the biggest customers at Rabbit Air are schools, dentists and homes for the elderly specifically as our units filter out 99.97% of particles down to 0.3 microns in size. This is important to all of us this year. I’m much happier to know any viruses floating around in my house will spend most of their life caught in a HEPA filter.

This isn’t the only reason to have a quality air purifier with TRUE HEPA filtration (which Rabbit Air purifiers are). Unless you are an allergy sufferer, you probably don’t think about the triggers floating around you. But for many, ignoring pet dander and pollen is not an option. Hay fever affects between 10 and 30 percent of all adults in the U.S. and as many as 40 percent of children, according to Healthline.com. They estimate as many as 60 million adults in the U.S. suffer from hay fever, and that number is increasing.

Now he can save his mask for shopping.

This is one reason Rabbit Air purifiers are in such high demand. Impurities are all around us—wildfires, pollution, pets, pollen, smoking—all these particles affect us when we breathe them in. I can’t control air pollution, smoke output from fires or even germs. Unless I make my home air tight, irritants will find their way in. 

What I can control is how the air inside my home is processed. By running my two Rabbit Air purifiers on AUTO mode, I am assured 1,440 sq ft of my house is being purified at all times. Whether my family is sleeping or awake, Rabbit Air is on patrol. 

This is why I have such an admiration for the company I work for. This is a good product. Because of it, I know thousands of schools, hospitals and homes have an extra edge on protection right now. There’s a lot we take for granted, but suddenly safe air can’t be one of them. Having my Rabbit Air purifiers is one way I know my family is protected.

And I don’t have to complain (as much) about dogs.

Posted in #Reviews | 3 Comments

The Final Issue of the Longest Year

The last issue of Space and Time magazine is now available on Amazon here. What a year… and somehow we never missed an issue. This is a testament to all our editors, associate editors, readers, proofers, artists, poets, authors… it takes a village. Because of teamwork, we close this year still standing.

This also marks the second year of our time with the magazine. The first year was a test run to get familiar with the publication, staff and readers. The second year was where we would find our stride we thought. Then 2020 came along and collectively kicked all the feet out from under everyone simultaneously.

We are pleased to still be here. We thought we might make a few changes to the magazine in 2020… tweaks really. We introduced an audiobook version of each issue and thought that would be the exciting news of the year. Instead, it’s been 2020. I think everything has changed. We’ve pivoted more than the New York City Ballet just to remain on stage.

It’s with great relief I close out this year and present #139, the final issue of Space and Time for 2020. And with that, I have no more words. I’m off to toast the full moon, the end of this year and hope for the new one… and I may not stop toasting until the new one 🍾😂 🥂

Posted in #SpaceandTimeMagazine | 2 Comments

For the Less Festive of Us, a.k.a. Most of Us

To those of you who are loving the holiday, please stop reading. I respect your festivities and wish you the merriest of whatever you celebrate. I’m genuinely happy that the worst thing you are worrying about this season is slow shipping. Retain that joy for as long as you can. This is for the rest of us. I think it’s for most of us.

This is for all the homeless I see tucked in behind the dumpsters now that the library is forced to close to the public. There is no more warm day shelter, no computers to use so they can check up on jobs, contact family and apply for assistance.

This is for the man begging for change on the corner. I couldn’t read the sign he held, but I could see he was crying in the cold. Message received. This is for the 700+ cars I see lined up at the local food distribution. Why did I see them? Because I was one of those cars.

This is for the mother I came across at Walmart yesterday when I snuck in to buy half and half, a former staple that has become a luxury. This woman was so happy filling her cart with gifts. As I passed, I overheard this snippet of conversation:

“Shouldn’t you calm down? You can’t afford all this stuff and the bill’s gonna hurt come January,” said a young woman with her.

“Nope!” The mother tossed an armload of festive Christmas candy into her cart, already piled high. “We’re getting a $2,000 check and my baby is gonna have a good Christmas.”

I can’t help but think of this poor woman as I scan headlines this morning. Not only is there no $2,000 stimulus check coming at this moment, but there’s a good possibility there is no stimulus at all for now. I’m not pointing fingers at anyone. We all know who to blame, and we all probably disagree who that is anyways, so no political rants from me.

This is for us as well. Ryan switched jobs due to COVID early on in the pandemic and took a pay cut. My super part time library job suddenly became important. Now even those hours are cut to the quick. I’ve spent much of December job hunting. Something I never thought I’d say, my royalties have made the difference. Things are tight, but we aren’t sunk. Many, many people are not so lucky.

To say this has been a tough month is silly. It’s been a tough year. I don’t think I know anyone who hasn’t lost someone. A few days ago we had an armed but peaceful protest downtown here in Kansas City. The same day in Oregon a not-so-peaceful group stormed the capitol building, smashing glass doors. One woman even brought a pitchfork, perhaps not understanding that the “torch and pitchfork” is a trope to convey ignorant violence—the tool of mindless mobs and witch hunts.

Naturally unfestive, I am one of the least qualified to offer holiday cheer, so I won’t try. Unfestive is not the same as heartless, however, and I am deeply concerned for everyone who will be spending the end of 2020 in the cold, alone and hungry.

In past years that was more a theoretical thing to say. This year, it’s substantial. Many, many are in significant emotional, financial and physical pain this year, around the world. Most of us are helpless to make a big impact. But we aren’t helpless to make any impact.

We can do our best in whatever dark little corner we find ourselves in. A thin, wavering flame still glows, however weak. Even if we have nothing to share but a smile… that might be just enough for someone. There have been times in my own life where that made the difference to me.

I won’t say happy holidays because for the large majority of us, they aren’t. Hunger, pending evictions, violence and the pandemic continue to take their toll. The worst is ahead, not behind. I would be delusional to suggest otherwise. But don’t despair. There’s hope.

For one, you have incredible resilience. I know this because you made it to the end of this long, dismal post on Christmas eve. Also, we’ve been here before. Maybe not you and I, but the world. The news and politicians like to use the work unprecedented, but that’s hyperbole. We’ve been through many apocalypses through the eons. It may feel like the end of the world, but it isn’t. The world is a little bigger than just this. Finally, we still have something to give: love. If we can share that, many of our problems will become insignificant.

We won’t have to argue about politics, masks and how germs work because kind people respect each other. This alone would get rid of a lot of the 2020 angst. There won’t be any need to bring a pitchfork to a demonstration because kind people don’t run in mindless mobs.

Kind doesn’t mean weak: you can stand up for yourself without hatred. You can voice your thoughts without screaming. The bonus of acting in love is people might even listen… especially if you do it first. We can all be the example we would like others to be.

May your holiday be as bright, as safe and as warm as possible this year. May we all be blessed to find next year a better one. That shouldn’t be too difficult… 2020 has not set the bar too high for that.

Posted in #amthinking | 2 Comments

Space and Time Submissions OPEN

It’s that time again! Poetry and prose submissions open until January 2, 2021. Once again we will be using Duotrope‘s submissions manager (Duosuma) for fiction so you can keep up on your submission’s status from your Duotrope account.

For fiction submissions go here.

For poetry submissions go here.

Posted in #KCLocal, #SpaceandTimeMagazine, #Submit | Leave a comment

The Bury Box by Lee Andrew Forman

The Bury Box by Lee Andrew Forman has all the things I love in a classic creepy story. There are evil children, dysfunction and death and all of it takes place in a haunted house that, if I recall correctly, Lee says he actually lived in as a child. I’ll see if he won’t do an interview for us here and tell us about it in the near future. I can’t resist a real life haunting.

Graphic imagery and violence paint an ugly picture that is all too common in many households that aren’t haunted by something sinister. Add supernatural elements and you have a coke fueled rampage into mayhem that doesn’t stop until the final page is turned.

You can find The Bury Box by by Lee Andrew Forman here.


#amreading

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From Black Cranes: Little Worm

The final tale in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women is “Little Worm” by Geneve Flynn, and her second story in the book (“A Pet is for Life” here). Beware, “Little Worm” is intensely creepy. The atmosphere is sinister and oppressive almost from the first lines. Sweltering and haunted…

“Little Worm” by Geneve Flynn from Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women

It is the kind of story that travels from the page to your hallway to remain at the dark end as a wavering disturbance in the air. Flynn uses foreshadowing like a fine artist, letting the story tighten around the reader until they are gasping by the final reveal.

The characters are solidly fleshed out and the dialogue is natural. A good, well crafted story with exceptional world building. The ending is horrifying and yet the reader can’t help but to wonder if they wouldn’t do the same. We are hardwired to protect the innocent… hideous and dangerous as they may be.

“Little Worm” by Geneve Flynn is the 14th and final story in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women an anthology of Asian women in horror. Geneve Flynn is a fiction editor that loves to help authors write what they mean and mean what they write. She has two psychology degrees which she only uses for nefarious purposes and is a proud  member of the Institute of Professional Editors Ltd (IPEd), the Chartered Institute of Editing and ProofreadingVision Writers Group, the Australasian Horror Writers Association and the Horror Writers Association.

She’s also been a submissions reader for the Aurealis magazine and a judge for the Australian Shadows Awards for short fiction. A horror writer with a love of tales that unsettle and B-grade action movies, her short stories have been published in Australia as well as internationally. You can catch her having fun with the Brisbane Writers’ Workshop, where she co-facilitates creative writing classes. Check out the fabulous workshops here.

If you’d like help getting the story in your head onto the page, check out her editing services here. Want something that will send chilly fingers down your spine? Check out her published works and see if anything takes your fancy.

Get your copy of Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women
direct from the publisher here.


Find out about the other stories
in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women (and more)
here under the #amreading tag.

Related links:
Black Cranes: A Review in Verse by Renata Pavrey | Tomes and Tales
Skeleton Hour 04: Black Cranes | Horror Writers
Black Cranes Release Day Panel | Omnium Gatherum
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray I | Gingernuts of Horror
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray II | Gingernuts of Horror
Meet Black Crane Lee Murray | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Grace Chan | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Geneve Flynn | AngelaYurikoSmith.com

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From Black Cranes: Frangipani Wishes

The 13th tale in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women is Lee Murray’s “Frangipani Wishes.” This is her second tale in the book (“Phoenix Claws” here) and the two stories are so different they could have been written by different authors. A compliment to Murray’s ability to write in diverse voices, she brings a deep tragedy to “Frangipani Wishes” where “Phoenix Claws” sizzles with black humor. Both are brilliant.

“Frangipani Wishes” by Lee Murray from Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women

In “Frangipani Wishes” Murray presents us with a wasted life. A young girl makes a mistake that haunts the remainder of her days. Murray catches the grim fate that is the reality for unwed mothers in many cultures. Whether a baby is the product of rape or a lapse in judgement, in many cultures it signifies an unforgiveable sin on the mother’s head.

The irony of the title just adds to the story. The frangipani is a fragrant flower often used at weddings to represent the union between two people. For girls like the protagonist, one slip up means all their hopes for a decent future will forever remain unfulfilled wishes.

We tell our daughters they are treasures until they have desires of their own, and then we sometimes treat them as garbage. Who has the right to take value from any life, let alone our own children?

“Frangipani Wishes” by Lee Murray is the 13th story in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women, an anthology of Asian women in horror. Three-time international Bram Stoker Award-finalist, Lee Murray is New Zealand’s most awarded speculative fiction writer and editor (Sir Julius Vogel, Australian Shadows).

She is the author of numerous novels, novellas, and short fiction including the double award-winning Taine McKenna speculative thriller series (Severed Press), and supernatural crime-noir series Path of Ra (Raw Dog Screaming Press) which she co-writes with Wellington author, Dan Rabarts. She is proud to have edited sixteen anthologies of dark fiction. Lee lives with her family in the sunny Bay of Plenty where she conjures up stories for readers of all ages from her office overlooking a cow paddock.

Get your copy of Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women
direct from the publisher here.


Find out about the other stories
in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women (and more)
here under the #amreading tag.

Related links:
Black Cranes: A Review in Verse by Renata Pavrey | Tomes and Tales
Skeleton Hour 04: Black Cranes | Horror Writers
Black Cranes Release Day Panel | Omnium Gatherum
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray I | Gingernuts of Horror
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray II | Gingernuts of Horror
Meet Black Crane Lee Murray | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Grace Chan | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Geneve Flynn | AngelaYurikoSmith.com

Posted in #amreading | Leave a comment

From Black Cranes: The Mark

The second story by Grace Chan in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women—and the twelfth story of the collection—”The Mark” is quite unlike the last one I read by her (“Of Hunger and Fury” here) but in a good way. Where “Of Hunger” was a visceral ghost story, in “The Mark” I wasn’t sure if I was reading a woman’s story of madness, an allegory on marital dishonesty or actual events. Perhaps it was a combination. This doesn’t detract from the story at all, but adds to the depth.

Chan brings the reader into the story to seamlessly experience the confusion and discomfort of the narrator as her relationship, and world collapses. Chan artfully gilds mundane events with a sinister glint. Things we all say every day take on a new twist as the narrator relates them with surrealism that progresses with the story. By the end, I’m not sure what the truth is, but the narrator and the reader can all agree—something is very, very wrong.

“The Mark” by Grace Chan from Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women

Chan’s last story gave me a feeling of fury. This story communicates cold dysphoria. I think we have all experienced a relationship that has a falsehood embedded somewhere. The challenge is to figure out how deep and damaging it runs. Another excellent story by Grace Chan.

“The Mark” by Grace Chan is the twelfth story in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women, an anthology of Asian women in horror. Grace Chan is a Melbourne-based speculative fiction writer and doctor. Her family immigrated from Malaysia to Australia before her first birthday. She completed a medical degree in 2012 and is currently working and training in psychiatry. Her inspirations include Oliver Sacks, Ursula Le Guin, Isobelle Carmody, China Mieville, Ken Liu and Ted Chiang. In her downtime, she enjoys coffee, space operas, and thinking about where we come from and where we’re all going.

Her writing can be found in Going Down Swinging #39 and Monash University’s upcoming Verge Anthology. Her novella, ‘The Ship of Theseus,’ has been shortlisted for Seizure’s Viva la Novella VII.

Get your copy of Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women
direct from the publisher here.


Find out about the other stories
in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women (and more)
here under the #amreading tag.

Related links:
Black Cranes: A Review in Verse by Renata Pavrey | Tomes and Tales
Skeleton Hour 04: Black Cranes | Horror Writers
Black Cranes Release Day Panel | Omnium Gatherum
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray I | Gingernuts of Horror
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray II | Gingernuts of Horror
Meet Black Crane Lee Murray | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Grace Chan | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Geneve Flynn | AngelaYurikoSmith.com

Posted in #amreading | Leave a comment

From Black Cranes: Fury

The eleventh story in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women is “Fury” by Christina Sng. One of the longer stories in the anthology, this is an exciting run-for-your-life adventure through danger from every angle that hits uncomfortably close to home.

The lead protagonist is Kate and she’s no stranger to challenges. A proud veteran of war at just 18, she is also the only girl in the Sundaland Forces. The threat plays out like a 2020 conspiracy theory as a virus ravages the world. Action packed prose keeps the reader turning pages as they rush to the end. Reading this in the middle of a real life virus pandemic added an uncomfortable realism to the tale.

“Fury” by Christina Sng from Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women

The story rushes forward at the pace of a thriller, whipping through high stakes scenarios with an interesting cast of characters. Sng creates a world apart from ours with disturbing similarities, especially given current events. An exciting read, in the end we have to ask ourselves how much we are willing to pay for utopia?

“Fury” by Christina Sng is the eleventh tale in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women. Christina Sng is the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of A Collection of Nightmares, Elgin Award runner-up Astropoetry, and A Collection of Dreamscapes. Her poetry, fiction, and art appear in numerous venues worldwide and her poems have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, the Rhysling Awards, the Dwarf Stars, the Elgin Awards, as well as received honorable mentions in the Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, and the Best Horror of the Year. Christina’s first novelette Fury was published this year in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women and her next book of poems The Gravity of Existence is forthcoming in 2022.

Get your copy of Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women
direct from the publisher here.


Find out about the other stories
in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women (and more)
here under the #amreading tag.

Related links:
Black Cranes: A Review in Verse by Renata Pavrey | Tomes and Tales
Skeleton Hour 04: Black Cranes | Horror Writers
Black Cranes Release Day Panel | Omnium Gatherum
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray I | Gingernuts of Horror
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray II | Gingernuts of Horror
Meet Black Crane Lee Murray | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Grace Chan | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Geneve Flynn | AngelaYurikoSmith.com

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From Black Cranes: The Ninth Tale

This story in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women stole my heart from the first sentence when the little fox spirit steals a scalp from a corpse. “The Ninth Tale” by Rena Mason is full of prose as delicate—and deadly—as her protagonist Jùhua. From her dainty lotus feet to the hidden bone that lends her the appearance of a maiden, this fox spirit on a mission is one to love.

“The Ninth Tale” by Rena Mason from Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women

This story reads like a brilliant tapestry full of color and intricate detail. From the rich atmosphere to the thoughts of Jùhua, Mason creates a world in just a few pages. Populating this beautiful world are characters that become flesh and breathe from their first paragraph. The story travels to unexpected places I couldn’t guess while maintaining a magical logic that kept me believing.

The most surprising thing to me was the quick affection I had for Mason’s fox spirit. I could so clearly see the intricately decorated maiden she brought to life and I experienced instant adoration. Jùhua evokes the spirit of feminine power. No victim, she is full of wiles she employs to satisfy her wishes. Lively and lovely prose, I hope Rena Mason will bring us more stories of the huli jing soon.

“The Ninth Tale” by Rena Mason is the ninth tale in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women. Rena Mason is an American author of Thai-Chinese descent, and the Bram Stoker Award® winning author of The Evolutionist and “The Devil’s Throat”, as well as a 2014 Stage 32 / The Blood List Search for New Blood Quarter-Finalist. She writes horror and dark speculative fiction.  

She is a member of the Horror Writers Association, Mystery Writers of America, International Thriller Writers, The International Screenwriters’ Association, and Stage 32. An avid scuba diver, she has traveled the world and enjoys incorporating the experiences into her stories. She currently resides in Reno, Nevada.

Get your copy of Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women
direct from the publisher here.


Find out about the other stories
in Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women (and more)
here under the #amreading tag.

Related links:
Black Cranes: A Review in Verse by Renata Pavrey | Tomes and Tales
Skeleton Hour 04: Black Cranes | Horror Writers
Black Cranes Release Day Panel | Omnium Gatherum
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray I | Gingernuts of Horror
Black Cranes: Tales of Unquiet Women by Lee Murray II | Gingernuts of Horror
Meet Black Crane Lee Murray | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Grace Chan | AngelaYurikoSmith.com
Meet Black Crane Geneve Flynn | AngelaYurikoSmith.com

Posted in #amreading | Leave a comment