Introducing J. Michael Jocelyn

J. Michael Jocelyn is a name you may not be familiar with yet, but this political activist and poet is sure to start gaining notoriety as a unique voice that sounds boldly. I had the pleasure of interviewing Jocelyn recently. He is a man with much to say…

Welcome! Thanks for taking the time for this interview. In your own words, please introduce yourself.

I’m J. Michael Jocelyn. I’m a father, thinker, and an optimist. My hope is the possibility of pushing our community into realizing that the options of being responsible and kind is squarely within our reach.

What is your mission in life?

I hope to be part of a process which stimulates the youth in seeing greatness as an opportunity. The liberal agenda justifies our failures with racism and injustice at every path. The young ones do not know when they should be held accountable for their actions. The African American youth have all the mechanism to achieve at every front but instead is forced to focus on excuses and barriers.

You served in the US Air Force, and your humanitarian service efforts won you an Achievement Medal and a Humanitarian Service Medal. How has that affected your mission in life?  

Life is a journey. It is crucial to assure this voyage is full of meaningful experiences in transforming the lives of others. The ability to assist and make a difference is within all of us. There is a natural part of the human experiences which pushes the individual to make a difference in the world. The ability to dream big and commit ourselves to some higher cause are suppressed by the prevailing notion that our contribution in the lives of others are irrelevant.


You have a poetry book set to release soon. Can you tell us about that book and what inspired you to write it?

The book is about suffering. The affliction of young people influences the figurative documentation of this misery. The plight of black children is mainly caused by a liberal agenda which justifies every action of African American males as a reaction to racism. We are influenced over and over that our irresponsible behavior in being a good father is justified. In reality, it makes no different the condition our situation; we have a duty always to strive to make a difference in the lives of our children.

I recently read on your blog about the high rate of African Americans, especially black males, in jail. What are some of your thoughts on how this trend can be reversed?

The process starts and ends with us. As black males, we have to take accountability to be better. We have to move from a liberal mindset which makes excuses for all our actions. There needs to come a time when we realize there is nothing to be gain from society by crying. We have everything at our disposal. The problem remains with us to take the initiative to make a difference in the world.


As a father, teacher, minister, and life coach you are used to setting a good example for others in leadership roles. What are some of the challenges you face that help you relate to those you help?

My failings enlighten my view of the problem of families. Parenting requires a meaningful contribution from all parties involved. Leadership teaches us that there is no room for excuses. The need to be a great father or mother requires a committed effort from every parent to search deep and make a significant contribution in the lives of their offspring. Success comes by the realization that a committed effort is not a choice but a duty.


What can we expect for you in the future? Do you have any other projects planned?

I’m working on a book which analyzes the notion of blackness. Blackness is defined with various negative connotations, mainly from the black liberal elite. There is a need to rescue this notion from a liberal agenda which makes excuses for the worst behavior to keep a captivated liberal base.

 

About Angela Yuriko Smith

Angela Yuriko Smith's work has been published in several print and online publications, including the “Horror Writers Association's Poetry Showcase” vols. 2-4, “Christmas Lites” vols. 1-6 and the “Where the Stars Rise: Asian Science Fiction and Fantasy” anthology. She has nearly 20 books of speculative fiction and poetry for adults, YAs and children. Her first collection of poetry, “In Favor of Pain,” was nominated for an 2017 Elgin Award.
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