Shift Happens: Writing as Therapy

I always love having a piece in Evolving Kansas City. I don’t do a lot of nonfiction anymore so it’s nice to dip back in sometimes. Up until now, I’ve always forgotten to get a copy. I think I’m on article #3 for them and this is the first time I’m actually holding one in my hands. It feels like going on vacation to somewhere exotic. Here I am, hanging out with massage therapists and herbalists… still talking about writing.

I know the text in the image will be difficult to read, even if you click to enlarge, so lucky for us Evolving Magazine has the whole thing posted online. Travel with me to this holistic place and see a horror writer on her best behavior.

Shift Happens: Writing as Therapy
By Angela Yuriko Smith

What if you could find a way to transform negative energy into positive, joyful energy? 

Meditation, medication, mediation… there are multi million dollar mega industries dedicated to profiting off of our need for positivity. We often avoid consciously processing what we perceive as negative emotions. Culturally we are taught to ‘keep a stiff upper lip’ and that we are at our most attractive when we smile. This is a wonderful sentiment, but not very practical—or healthy.  Read the rest at EvolvingMagazine.com.

 

About Angela Yuriko Smith

Angela Yuriko Smith is an American poet, publisher and author. Her first collection of poetry, In Favor of Pain, was nominated for an 2017 Elgin Award. Her latest novella, Bitter Suites, is a 2018 Bram Stoker Awards® Finalist. Currently, she publishes Space and Time magazine, a 53 year old publication dedicated to fantasy, horror and science fiction. For more information visit SpaceandTimeMagazine.com or AngelaYSmith.com.
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One Response to Shift Happens: Writing as Therapy

  1. Marge Simon says:

    Good advice, Angela! I did that myself — wrote my (now ex’s) death. I never sold it because the first editor who saw it (a man) didn’t like it at all. It wasn’t the writing, it was just an unpleasant sort of story. But I was done anyway. It helped some, I admit. But I really disliked him so much, there was no healing involved.

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